Taiwanese motherboard manufacturers to hike prices of their motherboards soon

If you intend to buy a new motherboard for the upcoming INTEL Sandy bridge platform, you better hurry as prices might soar in 2011.

According to news from Digitimes, it is reported that Taiwan-based motherboard makers including Asustek Computer, Gigabyte Technology and Micro-Star International (MSI) plan to hike the prices of their motherboards to reflect rising raw material, chipset and labor costs.

Motherboard prices are likely to be hiked by 10% on average in the next three months, but some models could increase by 15-20% if labor costs in China continue to rise, the sources added.

PCB suppliers have raised their quotes drastically as copper prices have climbed to US$9,000 a ton recently from the previous US$6,000, the sources noted.

While labor costs in China have continued to escalate due to a shortage of workers, chipset vendor Intel has recently decided to suspend its production of G31 chipsets and instead is asking motherboard makers to take up G41 chipsets, which are more expensive, the sources said.

Get prepared for more expensive boards.

1 comment

  1. Motherboard Prices On The Rise in 2011 January 1, 2011 7:09 am  Reply

    [...] Tweet &nbsp Posted by Regeneration on January 1st, 2011, 12:11 AM If you intend to buy a new motherboard for the upcoming INTEL Sandy bridge platform, you better hurry as prices might soar in 2011. According to news from Digitimes, it is reported that Taiwan-based motherboard makers including Asustek Computer, Gigabyte Technology and Micro-Star International (MSI) plan to hike the prices of their motherboards to reflect rising raw material, chipset and labor costs. Motherboard prices are likely to be hiked by 10% on average in the next three months, but some models could increase by 15-20% if labor costs in China continue to rise, the sources added. PCB suppliers have raised their quotes drastically as copper prices have climbed to US$9,000 a ton recently from the previous US$6,000, the sources noted. Read the entire article in OCworkbench. [...]

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